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Let us take a journey through the wormhole.
Wormholes are bridges that connect disparate points in spacetime that theoretically can be utilized to travel into the past.  In one theory, this involves traveling through a traversable wormhole that exits into a region of space with a higher gravitational field than was present at the wormholes entrance (ex. near a black hole). Time dilation as a direct consequence of increased gravity would lead to slower aging at the exit of the wormhole.  Put another way, the exit of the wormhole would be “younger” than the entrance when observed from the outside (remember that the time dilation would not be detected by the traveler). For an outside observer, the traveler would exit the younger end of the wormhole at a time when it is the same age as the “older” entrance, effectively going back in time. Although the mathematics of general relativity can be applied to suggest that such time travel may be possible, a more philosophical approach reveals paradoxes that may discredit the entire idea.
Temporal paradoxes are logical contradictions that arise when the past is altered in any way.  The well-known “grandfather paradox” plays with the idea that if a time traveler were to go back into the past and kill their own grandfather, it would prevent their very own conception and existence.  Therefore, there would be no one in the future to have gone back in time!  A classic paradox.  Also known as a “consistency paradox”, this same idea can be applied to any action that alters the past.  Since it is absolutely true that the past occurred in a certain way to lead to one’s existence, it is a logically contradictory (impossible) for the past to have occurred in any other way.  Therefore, even if we were able to travel back in time using a wormhole, the traveler(s) would necessarily have to allow the past to play out as it had previously.
Everything that happens in spacetime must be a consistent solution to the laws of physics, meaning that you could not go back in time unless history showed that you had already arrived in the past and had not committed any act that alters the present..

Let us take a journey through the wormhole. Wormholes are bridges that connect disparate points in spacetime that theoretically can be utilized to travel into the past. In one theory, this involves traveling through a traversable wormhole that exits into a region of space with a higher gravitational field than was present at the wormholes entrance (ex. near a black hole). Time dilation as a direct consequence of increased gravity would lead to slower aging at the exit of the wormhole. Put another way, the exit of the wormhole would be “younger” than the entrance when observed from the outside (remember that the time dilation would not be detected by the traveler). For an outside observer, the traveler would exit the younger end of the wormhole at a time when it is the same age as the “older” entrance, effectively going back in time. Although the mathematics of general relativity can be applied to suggest that such time travel may be possible, a more philosophical approach reveals paradoxes that may discredit the entire idea. Temporal paradoxes are logical contradictions that arise when the past is altered in any way. The well-known “grandfather paradox” plays with the idea that if a time traveler were to go back into the past and kill their own grandfather, it would prevent their very own conception and existence. Therefore, there would be no one in the future to have gone back in time! A classic paradox. Also known as a “consistency paradox”, this same idea can be applied to any action that alters the past. Since it is absolutely true that the past occurred in a certain way to lead to one’s existence, it is a logically contradictory (impossible) for the past to have occurred in any other way. Therefore, even if we were able to travel back in time using a wormhole, the traveler(s) would necessarily have to allow the past to play out as it had previously. Everything that happens in spacetime must be a consistent solution to the laws of physics, meaning that you could not go back in time unless history showed that you had already arrived in the past and had not committed any act that alters the present. ...

Inside the Earth 😍😮😍 Amazing Video Show Earth's Interior

Inside the Earth 😍😮😍 Amazing Video Show Earth's Interior "Crust, Mantle & Core" #geology #science #earth #crust #mantle #core ...

Trihexaflexagon: folded and glued out of a single strip of paper this object has six distinct sides made from three sets of triangle panels. Discovered in 1939 by mathematician Author Stone and developed along with fellow Princeton student Richard Feynman and others, but made popular by Martin Gardner. ➡️ Follow the link in my @physicsfun profile to make one yourself with scissors, white glue, and a printer. #math #mathtoy #mathstoy #hexaflexagon #trihexaflexagon #Feynman #topology #physics #physicstoy #geometry #martingardner #origami #science #algorithm #MartinGardener #scienceisawesome.

Trihexaflexagon: folded and glued out of a single strip of paper this object has six distinct sides made from three sets of triangle panels. Discovered in 1939 by mathematician Author Stone and developed along with fellow Princeton student Richard Feynman and others, but made popular by Martin Gardner. ➡️ Follow the link in my @physicsfun profile to make one yourself with scissors, white glue, and a printer. #math #mathtoy #mathstoy #hexaflexagon #trihexaflexagon #Feynman #topology #physics #physicstoy #geometry #martingardner #origami #science #algorithm #MartinGardener #scienceisawesome ...

No!
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Posted @withrepost • @maths.meme Knowing how infinity works makes a world of difference
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u/Sarcon5673
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Memes concerning maths. #funny #math #maths #meme #memes #number #numbers #science #physics #school #dankmemes.

No! . . . Posted @withrepost@maths.meme Knowing how infinity works makes a world of difference - u/Sarcon5673 - Memes concerning maths. #funny #math #maths #meme #memes #number #numbers #science #physics #school #dankmemes ...

i get asked all the time- why do you make your notes look pretty? couldn’t you use your time for other things? i’ve even had someone use my first failed ochem exam against me, blasting it and saying “maybe if she hadn’t taken so much time on her notes, she would have passed”. i could answer that first question in a number of ways. i’m pretty fast at making my notes, so why not? my handwriting just looks like that, it’s not taking extra time. the color sorting helps me group ideas. i could go on and on.

but in the end, why do i do it?

because it makes me happy.

at my core, i’m an artist. i love creating, i love cohesion and structure and organizing visual aspects. making my notes nice is a little thing that brings me joy in the midst of premed stress and life stress.

i learned early on not to defend myself against people being rude for no reason. if people want to criticize something that brings me joy, then that just reflects on their character, not mine.

as for me, i’ll keep at it. for those of you who have a study method that brings you joy, HOLD ON TO IT. i LOVE notes, i LOVE my big ol whiteboards. while they’re not the most efficient ways to study, they’re effective and i love creating them.

as long as you’re not hurting anyone, don’t let people judge what makes you happy, no matter what it is..

i get asked all the time- why do you make your notes look pretty? couldn’t you use your time for other things? i’ve even had someone use my first failed ochem exam against me, blasting it and saying “maybe if she hadn’t taken so much time on her notes, she would have passed”. i could answer that first question in a number of ways. i’m pretty fast at making my notes, so why not? my handwriting just looks like that, it’s not taking extra time. the color sorting helps me group ideas. i could go on and on. but in the end, why do i do it? because it makes me happy. at my core, i’m an artist. i love creating, i love cohesion and structure and organizing visual aspects. making my notes nice is a little thing that brings me joy in the midst of premed stress and life stress. i learned early on not to defend myself against people being rude for no reason. if people want to criticize something that brings me joy, then that just reflects on their character, not mine. as for me, i’ll keep at it. for those of you who have a study method that brings you joy, HOLD ON TO IT. i LOVE notes, i LOVE my big ol whiteboards. while they’re not the most efficient ways to study, they’re effective and i love creating them. as long as you’re not hurting anyone, don’t let people judge what makes you happy, no matter what it is. ...

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Link in-Bio Download 📚♾ What Do U think about this? 👍 Share with us - Comment below - ➡️ Follow 👉 @napoleon.hill ➡️ Follow 👉 @napoleon.hill ➡️ Follow 👉 @napoleon.hill ➡️ Follow 👉 @napoleon.hill - - #thinkandgrowrich #napoleonhill #tgrmovie #elitemastermind #mindvalley #tonyrobbins #mastermind #mentor #leadership #leaders #nevergiveup #entrepreneurs #jimrohn #success #desire #goals #knowledge #science #application #garyvee ...

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“The world has used me so unkindly, I fear it has made me suspicious of everyone.” - Mary Anning
. . . 
Mary Anning (21 May 1799 - 9 March 1847) was a English fossil collector, dealer and palaeontologist, who was born #onthisday in 1799. She became known around the world for important finds she made in Jurassic marine fossil beds in the cliffs along the English Channel at Lyme Regis in Dorset. Her findings contributed to important changes in scientific thinking about prehistoric life and the Earth’s history. Although she became well known in geological circles, Anning was not allowed to join the Geological Society of London, and this quote is from a letter expressing her sadness. For years, Mary Anning was an unsung heroine of palaeontology, as she did not always receive full credit for her scientific contributions. The campaign @maryanningrocks aims to get a statue erected of the famed palaeontologist to finally recognise her historic importance. Follow them for more info!
. . . 
Mary Anning came from a poor family, and fossil hunting became their family business. It was a dangerous task that never made Anning rich. Landslides exposed new fossils that had to be collected before they were lost to the sea. In 1833, Anning almost died when a landslide buried her black-and-white terrier, Tray, her constant companion when she went collecting. Her discoveries included the first ichthyosaur skeleton correctly identified; the first two more complete plesiosaur skeletons found; the first pterosaur skeleton located outside Germany; and many important fish fossils. Her observations played a key role in the discovery that coprolites, known as bezoar stones at the time, were fossilised faeces. She also discovered that belemnite fossils contained fossilised ink sacs like those of modern cephalopods. . . . 
#historicwoman #MaryAnning #birthdaygirl #thisdayinhistory #todayinhistory #history #womenshistory #herstory #Britishhistory #JurassicCoast #Dorset #seaside #shesellsseashells #fossilhunting #fossilcollector #fossils #palaeontologist #womeninscience #womeninSTEM #STEMgirls #womenscientists #science #palaeontology #womenwhorock #maryanningrocks #inspirationalwoman.

“The world has used me so unkindly, I fear it has made me suspicious of everyone.” - Mary Anning . . . Mary Anning (21 May 1799 - 9 March 1847) was a English fossil collector, dealer and palaeontologist, who was born #onthisday in 1799. She became known around the world for important finds she made in Jurassic marine fossil beds in the cliffs along the English Channel at Lyme Regis in Dorset. Her findings contributed to important changes in scientific thinking about prehistoric life and the Earth’s history. Although she became well known in geological circles, Anning was not allowed to join the Geological Society of London, and this quote is from a letter expressing her sadness. For years, Mary Anning was an unsung heroine of palaeontology, as she did not always receive full credit for her scientific contributions. The campaign @maryanningrocks aims to get a statue erected of the famed palaeontologist to finally recognise her historic importance. Follow them for more info! . . . Mary Anning came from a poor family, and fossil hunting became their family business. It was a dangerous task that never made Anning rich. Landslides exposed new fossils that had to be collected before they were lost to the sea. In 1833, Anning almost died when a landslide buried her black-and-white terrier, Tray, her constant companion when she went collecting. Her discoveries included the first ichthyosaur skeleton correctly identified; the first two more complete plesiosaur skeletons found; the first pterosaur skeleton located outside Germany; and many important fish fossils. Her observations played a key role in the discovery that coprolites, known as bezoar stones at the time, were fossilised faeces. She also discovered that belemnite fossils contained fossilised ink sacs like those of modern cephalopods. . . . #historicwoman #MaryAnning #birthdaygirl #thisdayinhistory #todayinhistory #history #womenshistory #herstory #Britishhistory #JurassicCoast #Dorset #seaside #shesellsseashells #fossilhunting #fossilcollector #fossils #palaeontologist #womeninscience #womeninSTEM #STEMgirls #womenscientists #science #palaeontology #womenwhorock #maryanningrocks #inspirationalwoman ...